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New Haven Railroad Locks

December 1st, 2001

The New Haven, like most other railroads, used a variety of locks over the years to secure its property. Many of these locks were marked with the New Haven's corporate logo or initials to identify them as railroad property. All locks on this page are from the collection of Marc Frattasio.

Oldest Switch LockThis cast brass switch lock was used to secure switch stands during a period extending from before 1900 up to about the mid to late 1930s. The lock measures 3 1/2 inches from top to bottom and has the manufacturer's initials, 'The S. & E. M. Co.', stamped into the opposite side. After these old switch locks had been replaced by modern steel locks, many of them continued to be used for other purposes on the railroad.

This switch lock, which was made from a combination of cast steel, stamped steel, and brass parts, was made by the Corbin Company. It measures 4 inches from top to bottom. Such locks were used to secure switch stands starting in the mid to late 1930s through the Penn Central merger effective January 1st, 1969. These locks were common on the former New Haven Railroad up through the early 1980s and some may still be in service today.Corbin Switch Lock

Adlake LockThis switch lock, which was made from a combination of cast and stamped steel parts, was made by the Adams and Westlake Company. It measures 3 1/2 inches from top to bottom. Such locks were used to secure switch stands starting in the mid to late 1930s through the Penn Central merger effective January 1st, 1969. These locks were common on the former New Haven up through the early 1980s and some may remain in service today.

This cast brass lock, which was made by the Yale and Towne Manufacturing Company, was used to secure signal department property such as relay cabinets, battery boxes, switch machines, etc,. It measures 3 inches from top to bottom. Such locks were used starting in the mid to late 1930s through the Penn Central merger effective January 1st, 1969. These locks were common on the former New Haven up through the early 1980s and some may still be in service today.Old Yale Signal Lock

New Yale LockThis lock is a later version of the lock shown immediately above. Unlike the older lock, which was made in a custom die which incorporated the railroad's identification markings, the later lock was apparently a standard off-the-shelf item which had the railroad's markings, 'NYNH&HRR Sig Dept', stamped into it. These locks were common on the former New Haven Railroad up through the early 1980s and some may remain in service today.

This small (1 3/4 inch high) signal department ('S. D.') lock was used to secure interlocking and signal equipment cabinets inside interlocking towers. The date that these locks went into service is unknown, however, they were used in interlocking towers on the former New Haven Railroad long after the Penn Central merger and it is possible that some may remain in service today.Signal Cabinet Lock

Old Car LockThis lock, which was made out of a combination of cast steel and cast brass, was used to secure boxcar shipments on the New Haven Railroad during a period extending from before 1900 up to about the mid to late 1930s. The lock measures 4 inches from top to bottom. It may be difficult to see it in this scan, but the initials 'N.Y.N.H.&H.R.R.' are cast in raised letters on the black painted steel body of the lock.

This lock, which was made from a combination of cast steel, stamped steel, and brass parts, was made by the Corbin Company. It measures 4 inches from top to bottom. Such locks were used to secure boxcar shipments on the New Haven Railroad starting in the mid to late 1930s up to the Penn Central merger effective January 1st, 1969. This lock is identical in design to the Corbin switch lock shown above. However, this lock has 'Car Lock' stamped into the dust cover protecting its keyhole and it uses the New Haven's standard car lock key, not the standard switch lock key.New Car Lock

Yale PadlockThis 3 inch high cast brass lock, which was made by the Yale and Towne Manufacturing Company, is a complete mystery. It is clearly a New Haven lock but its purpose and period of use on the railroad are not known. It is possible that it is a signal department lock which predates the Yale examples shown above. However, the key it used was shaped differently from the Yale signal department locks.

PAST IMAGE PAGES

November 2001: The Streamlined Coaches

October 2001: The Comet

September 2001: Seashore Tours

August 2001: John Held, Jr. and the New Haven R.R.

July 2001: The East Wind

June 2001: The Rail-Auto Travel Plan

May 2001: Advertising Stickers

April 2001: Dietz Hand Lanterns

February 2001: Right of Way Signs

January 2001: Signal Lamps

December 2000: TDI Commuter Schedules

November 2000: To Florida on the New Haven Railroad!

October 2000: Local Schedules

September 2000: Train Service Cancellation Posters

August 2000: The New Haven Railroad Rail Charge Card

July 2000: Beverage Service!

June 2000: The Boat Race Trains

May 2000: Timetable Change Posters

April 2000: New Haven Railroad Station Signs

March 2000: The Key to New England

February 2000: Route 128 Station

January 2000: New Haven Railroad Cigarette Lighters

December 1999: The Dan'l Webster

November 1999: Postwar Travel Posters

October 1999: Modern Dining Car China

September 1999: New Haven Railroad Dining Car Service Pins

August 1999: New Haven Railroad Lapel Pins

July 1999: The 1939 New York World's Fair -- 60th Anniversary

June 1999: On-Train Ashtrays

April 1999: Matchbooks

March 1999: Pilgrim Tours

February 1999: Special Trains of the 1950s and 1960s

January 1999: Ticket Envelopes

December 1998: Holiday Advertising Material

November 1998: New York City Travel Advertising Material

October 1998: Boston Travel Advertising Material

September 1998: The Hurricane of 1938 -- 60th Anniversary

July 1998: The New Haven Goes Back to Cape Cod

June 1998: The 1964/1965 New York World's Fair

May 1998: Official Gifts of the McGinnis Era

April 1998: System Timetables

March 1998: Pre-War Advertising Brochures

February 1998: New Haven Railroad Freight Service Advertising from the 1950s and 1960s

January 1998: The Snow Trains

December 1997: Hotel Montclair Advertisement ca. 1939


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